Sauerkraut Survivor, Day 3: 36 hours later

There’s a lot going on today that wasn’t going on yesterday. Third day’s the charm!

After removing excess bring last [Thursday] night, this [Friday] morning I could see the brine rose again somewhat, but not in any danger of overflowing (I’m glad I didn’t wait to remove the brine!).

I can see separation lines in the cabbage on many of the jars indicating CO2 activity. So far the screens are doing their job well, although shifting slightly and making the brine slightly cloudy.

Brine samples are showing definite signs of Leuconostoc mesenteroides – we have babies!

The cabbage in all jars is looking more yellow now, and less green.

The pH is consistent for all jars at a pH of 4.5 to 5, so it is dropping finally. Yay!

Glucose is still measuring the highest glucose on the scale – 2000 (or more) mgs of glucose per deciliter (dL), or 4 tsp glucose per liter (a mason jar is just shy of a liter).

The Jars & Brine Samples: 36 Hours Later

Here are the photographs of the jars on the third day, with any notes I jotted down. I have included one of the photos I took of the bacteria sample seen with my AmScope microscope for each jar.

Jar 1 (Cheesecloth), Day 3
There are some bubbles forming on the surface of the brine, showing we’re in business. If you compare this photo to the one from day 2, you will see that the brine did come up a little. No visible mold or yeast.

See how the pH is lowering?

Glucose still pretty high.

I was able to detect LABs today in the brine sample I took. (click for full size)

Jar 2 (Olive Oil), Day 3
Still some bubbles in the olive oil, and the brine has risen up a little. No visible mold or yeast. The brine sample was nice and “happy.”

You can tell how fast the LABs were going by the blurs below…I would have taken a video, but I couldn’t get it to work until that evening.
(click for full size)

Jar 3 (Water Baggy), Day 3
No visible mold or yeast in this jar. The baggy seems to be doing a good job so far. Although the glucose was still measuring high, it took the full 30 seconds to reach the max number.

You can see how populated its getting in here. A lot going on, and the LABs were wiggly.
(click for full size)

Jar 4 (Cabbage Leaf held down by small jar), Day 3
You can see the cabbage has started to wilt a little bit. No visible mold or yeast, though.

Can you see the two long LABs on the left side?
(click for full size)

Jar 5 (Cabbage Leaf, Shot Glass, White Lid), Day 3
Cabbage pieces are clearly not being held down very well by the shot glass and cabbage leaf. But it looks like it’s going well enough – no visible mold or yeast.

LABs have arrived.
(click for full size)

Jar 6 (White Lid), Day 3
I am liking how the screen is doing in this jar. No visible mold or yeast.

Low population of LABs.
(click for full size)

Jar 7 (White Lid with Baggy), Day 3
See the CO2 bubbles on the top? Going well. You can see the flat marble weight has shifted and isn’t staying down well. Lots of activity. No visible mold or yeast.

LABs having a party.
(click for full size)

Jar 8 (White Lid with Airlock), Day 3
Sorry for the unfocused photo – I think you can make out CO2 bubbles along the rim. No visible mold or yeast.

LABs kicked into gear on day 3.
(click for full size)

Jar 9 (Metal Lid), Day 3
Brine is nice and full, with visible CO2. When I popped the cap off the glass test port, brine came out and onto the lid. This set-up does well for holding the pressure in, no doubt about that. No visible mold or yeast.

LABs are super-charged. Look at the density of their population!
(click for full size)

Jar 10 (Metal Lid with Airlock), Day 3
Lots of CO2 going on here – can you see it on the top of the rim? Brine was coming up in the glass test port when I went to take the sample. Had to wipe this one up, too. No visible mold or yeast.

LABs have a great population going and there is a lot of activity.
(click for full size)

Jar 11 (Cork with Airlock), Day 3
Bubbling, even foaming, around the top of the brine. No visible mold or yeast.

You can see the LABs – all those squiggles!
(click for full size)

Jar 12 (Lacto-fermentation Air-Lock System generously donated by Cooking God’s Way), Day 3
This jar is doing very well. Nice and full and CO2 along the top (hard to see in this photo as the brine is nice and high). No visible mold or yeast.

I didn’t take a sample on day 2, but today I took a sample through the airlock. Lots of activity and a great population of LABs.
(click for full size)

Jar 13 (Pickle Pro generously donated by Homesteader’s Supply), Day 3
You can see the foam on the top of the brine here. The brine is nice and uncluttered. No visible mold or yeast.

I love it when teeny cabbage pieces get in the brine. They are so pretty to look at. You can see a decent-sized LAB above the cabbage piece on the bottom of the photo.
(click for full size)

Jar 14 (Pickl-It purchased through the generosity of GNOWFGLINS), Day 3
The CO2 has made its way to the top of the brine, which is nice and green. No visible mold or yeast.

A nice population of LABs, and even some big guys.
(click for full size)

Jar 15 (Harsch purchased by the generous donations largely from Homesteader’s Supply along with with GAPS Diet Journey, Hybrid Rasta Mama, and Dishrag Diaries), Day 3
There are tiny bubbles on the lid under the water. I wish I knew what was going on inside :)

Jar 16 (Bucket), Day 3
Lots of CO2 action – look at those bubbles! Brine is still browned (which you can see better here). No visible mold or yeast.

Lots of LABs here in multiple sizes.
(click for full size)

Jar 17 (Fido), Day 3
I didn’t sample this jar today, and neglected to take a photo (this is day 2′s photo). No visible mold or yeast.

Jar 18 (Salsa Jar), Day 3
Can you see the evidence of this jar vomiting? Can’t say these threads aren’t giving a tight seal. No visible mold or yeast.

Lots of activity in this sample. Very good population of LABs.
(click for full size)

So, have you voted on the jars you think will do the best? If not, you can vote here (scroll down).

THANK YOU!

Many of the supplies (including the cabbage) purchased for testing were mostly covered by the donations from Loving Our Guts, Pickle Me Too, Easy Natural Food, Common Sense Homesteading, Lisa M., Traditional Foods, Grocery Geek, Rachel C., The Urban Hearth, Hybrid Rasta Mama, Sarah M, Miriam R., and Leslie C. THANK YOU!

The Lacto-fermentation Air-Lock System was generously donated by the manufacturer, Cooking God’s Way.

The Pickle Pro was generously donated by the manufacturer, Homesteader’s Supply.

The Pickl-It was purchased through the generosity of GNOWFGLINS.

The Harsch crock was purchased by the generous donations largely from Homesteader’s Supply along with with GAPS Diet Journey, Hybrid Rasta Mama, and Dishrag Diaries.

If you would like to contribute funds to this experiment, I would be ever grateful. Please send PayPal funds to: naturalfamilea@gmail.com. If you have a blog I would be happy to list it as a contributor. Thank you!

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Lea Harris founded Nourishing Treasures in 2006. A mom passionate about her family's health and well-being, Lea believes education is power. Encouraging others to take baby steps in the right direction of health for their families, Lea's goal is to raise awareness of what goes into our mouths and on our bodies, providing natural alternative information that promotes health and prevents disease by using traditional foods and nature's medicine.

Lea is a Certified Health Coach graduate from Beyond Organic University, and a Certified Aromatherapist graduate from Aromahead Institute.

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Sauerkraut Survivor, Day 3: 36 hours later — 7 Comments

    • I can actually see more detail directly through the ‘scope than what the camera is showing. It was super low-res. I have since upgraded to a 3MP camera which will be able to show more detail than you are seeing now.

      Thanks for stopping by!

  1. How many bacteria, yeasts, and molds do you have pictures of for comparison? Will you be able to identify pathogens? I’m still wondering what might be lurking in my non-anaerobic ferments. . . .

  2. Pingback: The 3 Biggest Fermenting Mistakes You’re Already Making | Food Renegade

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